How Often Should You Feed a Sourdough Starter?

Jar of sourdough starter on table with loaf of bread and baking utensils.

Making a homemade sourdough starter is a fairly simple process, but it can also bring up some questions, and one of those questions is how often you need to feed your sourdough starter. It can be a bit tricky sometimes, though, to answer the question of how often you should feed your starter because it can vary depending on a couple of different factors. 

How often you need to feed your sourdough starter will depend on the climate in your home, your schedule, and the amount of baking you plan to do. And since I like to keep my sourdough starter process as simple and easy as possible, the question of “how often should you feed a sourdough starter” really translates for me to “how little can you get away with feeding it and have it still survive and work for baking?”

I’ve tried to find a balance between not having to feed my sourdough starter too often but also having it be active and ready to use for baking. In this post I’ll share the method I use for deciding how often to feed my sourdough starter and some tips for how to tell when it needs more frequent feedings.

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DIY Herbal Salt Recipes to Try

Salt in mortar with pestle with bundle of herbs and pair of scissors on table

Making your own DIY herbal salt blends is a simple and easy way to create your own gourmet seasoning blends and to control the quality of the blends and customize them the way you like based on your favorite herbs and which dishes you like to cook.

DIY herbal salt blends are also a great way to preserve the harvest if you have an abundance of herbs growing in your garden that you want to save for later. Or, if you don’t have herbs growing in your garden, you can also often find good deals on herbs at local farm stands and farmer’s markets during their growing seasons. 

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How to Make Your Own Maple Syrup – Part 2: Boiling Down the Sap

How to make your own homemade maple syrup - Part 2: boiling down the sap into syrup

If you have a few backyard maple trees and you live in a climate where it’s below freezing at night and above freezing during the day time, then it’s really quite simple to make your own maple syrup and boil down the sap into delicious syrup that you can drizzle over pancakes or use in cooking and baking. 

In my last post I talked about all of the things involved in preparing for sugaring off, including: identifying trees, choosing the right time and place to tap the trees, drilling the hole, and setting up the taps and collection containers for the sap. If you haven’t read that post already, you can find it here: How to Make Homemade Maple Syrup – Part 1: Tapping Your Trees.

Today, we’ll talk about the rest of the steps we need to take in order to be able to get from watery sap to sweet maple syrup. 

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How to Make Homemade Maple Syrup: Tapping Your Maple Trees

How to make homemade maple syrup: tapping your maple trees

There are some aspects of homesteading that are definitely more challenging for those of us who live in suburban areas with small yards, but if you have maple trees in your backyard and you have the right climate, then learning how to make homemade maple syrup is a simple process that’s easy for a suburban homesteader to do. 

Making your own homemade maple syrup is a great way to know that your syrup is pure and organic, and it’s also a way that you can save some money since the supplies you need are usually not very expensive if you’re tapping just a few trees and producing syrup on a small scale. And since good quality maple syrup can be pretty expensive, it can be economical to make some of your own.

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How to Make A Backup Sourdough Starter

How to make a backup sourdough starter | ourheritageofhealth.com

If you like baking with a sourdough starter, the best thing you can do to make sure you can continue using it for a long time is to make a backup sourdough starter.

Even though sourdough starters are usually pretty resilient and hard to kill, if you neglect feeding it for too long, or if you go away on vacation and completely forget about your starter, the wild yeast can die off. 

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How to Cook from Scratch (Without Spending all Day in the Kitchen!)

How to cook from scratch (without spending all day in the kitchen!) 10 tips to make homemade cooking easier and faster.

Switching over to a healthier, real food lifestyle can seem a little bit daunting at first, especially if you’re used to grabbing fast food on the way home from work or popping a TV dinner in the microwave.

Cooking your own meals is the best way to save money, avoid the artificial ingredients in many processed foods, and ensure that the food you’re eating is good quality (since you know exactly what ingredients you’re using and how you’re preparing them.)

When you hear the phrase “cooking from scratch,” though, you might think of someone from your great-grandmother’s generation, spending hours and hours in the kitchen. But while it’s true that cooking healthy food from scratch takes might take more time than popping a TV dinner in the microwave, it doesn’t mean you have to spend all day in the kitchen either!

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12 Immune Boosting Foods You Already Have In Your Kitchen

12 immune boosting foods you probably already have in your kitchen | ourheritageofhealth.com

When we think of immune boosting foods, often some of the first things that come to mind are the exotic superfoods that are praised for their amazing healing properties.

We tend to think that if a food comes from a faraway place, or it it has an exotic-sounding name that’s hard to pronounce that it somehow has more nutrients or more beneficial properties than the “normal” foods do.

The superfoods that we sometimes forget about, though, are the more common ones that are just as good, especially since there are many different foods that all share the same types of nutrients and healing properties. So, if you’re looking for something high in antioxidants, for example, you don’t necessarily have to have an exotic berry from a faraway tropical island. The berries you could grow in your own backyard can be just as helpful.

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